Archive for Self Help

Many People Are Living with Food Intolerance Without Realizing It

Many people are living with a food intolerance without realizing it. Symptoms of a food intolerance (and food allergies) manifests in subtle, yet profoundly damaging ways. Brain fog, skin irritations, inflammation and behavioral symptoms are often ignored. This is your body trying to tell you that it is fighting off a pathogen.

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Moms! Win Tickets to The Warrior Mom Pajama Party

Are you a mom in the Central Texas Area? Neurogistics is proud to sponsor Healing Complex Kids’ Warrior Moms Pajama Party. You can win free tickets if you email info@neurogistics.com. First four who email get the tickets, so don’t hesitate!  » Read more..

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8 Ways to Acheive Your New Years Resolutions This Year

We want you to actually achieve your New Year Resolutions this year! Don’t let your health goals fall to the wayside like so many Americans. Did you know that just one week into the New Year, only 77 percent of resolution-makers are still on track? » Read more..

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12 Books That Make Great Gifts for Everyone on Your List

We’ve found 12 books that make great gifts no matter who you’re shopping for. All of these have healthy mind, body and spirit in mind. Whether there is a healthy eater, spiritual and mindfulness seeker, teen reader or parent on your list, these titles will be great presents. Give a gift that lasts longer than the holidays. These books help readers become healthier mentally, physically and spiritually. Maybe there is a title that would make a great gift for YOU too. What makes this even better?  Less stress for you! You can give books as presents without leaving your computer and they arrive just in time for the holidays. » Read more..

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9 Foods to Help You Fight Holiday Stress

The holidays are upon us and so is the stress and anxiety that often accompanies this festive time of year. It can be hard to take care of your body and your mind with things wrapping up before the years end, the shopping for others and schedule changes—that impact everyone. The most wonderful time of year is also a time when more people get sick, stressed and sad.

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Are You Addicted to Caffeine?

Is your Starbucks habit actually an addiction? The American Psychiatric Association (APA) lists Caffeine Addiction, more specifically, caffeine intoxication and withdrawal as a mental disorder in the new DSM-V. A few cups coffee or soda everyday may not seem like a big deal, but it impacts your brain and body more than you may think. » Read more..

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The Impact of Trauma: Books to Help You And Your Child Heal

Trauma reorganizes the nervous system. One’s brain, body and behaviors can be altered tremendously from external factors. Thousands of research studies show that brain chemistry changes, the immune system is compromised, and overtime physical and psychological health is impacted greatly by traumatic experiences, especially without the right forms of healing. Whether you are helping your child or you yourself have experienced trauma or PTSD, these books are excellent and highly recommended to help you understand and heal the impact of trauma on the brain and body. » Read more..

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Willpower: Why You Can’t Resist The Donut

willpower

By Emily Roberts MA, LPC

Do you ever wonder why it’s so hard to have self-control at a morning meeting, when the plate of delicious donuts are practically asking you to eat them? Isn’t it interesting that after the 20th time you have told your child “don’t touch that” they seem to forget and do it anyway?  Saying “no” to the sweet treat or controlling the impulse isn’t just about self-control, it’s more than willpower. You can learn right from wrong, but your brain can be much more powerful than logic.

Think of willpower like a muscle, if it’s not developed fully it can be weak; it can get exhausted by overuse, but just like our other muscles, we can repair it.

“It is as if self-control is a limited resource that ‘runs out’ if it is used too much,” said Chandra Sripada, the lead researcher in a study published last week in The Journal of Psychological Science.

Therefore all the effort in the word can’t keep little Timmy’s hands from reaching to touch the object of his affection or that sweet treat from hitting your lips. Researchers found that increasing levels of the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine can help to reduce urges and increase self-control.

The study, published April 22 in The Journal Psychological Science, indicates that when one has the right balance of these two neurotransmitters it can help prevent the depletion of self-control.  If you overuse the “muscle” the chemicals in your brain are too tired to say no.  Medications or supplementation may be the missing link by giving a boost to specific brain circuits that are often depleted after attempting to maintain self-control for long periods of time.

What is even more interesting and notable is that ones mood plays a vital role in impulsivity and aggression.

Research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) found that loss of self-control is also due to nutrition. When blood-glucose levels dropped, subjects were more likely to act on an urge.

“Self-control requires energy, and that energy is provided in part by glucose,” wrote lead study author Brad Bushman, a professor of communication and psychology at Ohio State University.

“Glucose is made from nutritious intake that becomes converted into neurotransmitters that provide energy for brain processes. Low glucose levels can undermine self-control because people have insufficient energy to overcome challenges and unwanted impulses,” wrote Bushman and his colleagues.

willpower

Wish you or your child could resist the urge to act on their impulses? As you can see it’s more than knowing right from wrong, it also takes a bit of a brain workout to build up that muscle.

  • Test the brain.  A simple urine analysis can show which levels are off, and results will suggest what supplementation will help increase self-control Neurotransmitters.
  •  What you eat effects willpower. What you feed your body affects how much energy the prefrontal cortex has to work with, where many of our impulsive decisions are made.  If you are not absorbing nutrients from the food in your gut, your brain is going to be cloudy.  Making sure that your blood sugar stays balanced, requires eating right and often, this means every 3-4 hours. For more self-control, stick to the foods that you know fuel your brain. Click Here for some great backpack snacks that boot brain power!
  • Talk with your health care practitioner about medications or supplementation that may be impacting your willpower. Notice what is difficult for you to resist, or what you wind up regretting later on in the day.  These actions are examples of what a boost of self-control could help you resist.
  • Repetition.  Although you may not get it on the first try, continuing to say no or practicing a new behavior, instead of the problematic one, can help rewire the brain.  That is, if you have enough power to run the system.

At the end of the day it takes gas and mechanics to keep a car running, the same is true for your brain.  Everyone needs help behaviorally and neurologically to make changes stick.

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Why Sleep Deprivation Is Killing You & 6 Ways to Solve It

sleep deprivation

By Emily Roberts MA, LPC

This is your wake-up call—literally. For years we have known that sleep deprivation is bad for our health, but a new study shows it actually destroys brain cells.  A study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience found that staying awake kills brain cells in mice, and researchers suggest it may do the same in humans. It’s the first study to show that sleep loss can lead to irreversible damage.

So, what do we do? 7-8 Hours of sleep sounds fantastic, but for many Americans it’s nearly impossible.  Not only is it a time an issue, but getting our brains to shut off can be easier said than done. Stress and hectic schedules make it hard to get the zzz’s one needs. Overtime, cortisol elevations cause shifts in other hormones (such as DHEA, Estrogen, Progesterone, and Testosterone), as well as depletion in neurotransmitter availability.  This often leads to sleep cycle disturbances, which then causes more stress on the body and the cycle continues.

sleep deprivation

We need sleep almost just as much as we need oxygen and food. Recent studies show that sleep may “detox” the brain, flushing out waste products linked to Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Sleep deprivation wears down our normal capacity to deal with daily aggravations and challenges, causing the cycle of stress to wear us down emotionally and physically.  Unfortunately, this can’t be fixed with good vibes alone.

One night alone of disrupted sleep lowers the threshold for “stress perception.” When you’re dead tired, or have had weeks of restless nights, just running an errand or getting stuck in traffic can seem dreadful and daunting.  It is a huge contributor to irritability, mood swings, and interpersonal relationship troubles (as you can imagine).

6 Ways to Solve Sleep Deprivation

1. Testing your neurotransmitters and cortisol levels is a natural way to balance your sleep cycle. It can be helpful to pinpoint what type of support will provide the fastest relief.  Results show what supplementation is needed—and will help work to adjust your sleep cycle. Neurogistics makes this easy with in home testing kits, and customized Brain Wellness Reports.

2. Wind down for 1 hour before bedtime. Ideally this would be unplugged, restorative time (e.g., relaxed reading, bath, or mediation practice). Something to induce the relaxation response. Sleep mediations are all over YouTube and can be listened to as you are lying in bed.

3. Don’t use electronics, even the Nook, an hour before bed.  Avoid TV, phone, tablet, emails, Netflix, Hulu, videogames in bed.  The light, and the activity stimulates excitatory neurotransmitter activity

4. Decrease Caffeine – it exacerbates anxiety and can create disturbances in your sleep patterns. If you drink coffee, tea or soda and you have anxiety, consider getting off caffeine or stopping before 12PM.

If your aim is to get off the caffeine kick, do this gradually:

  • Go from 2 coffees per day to 1.
  • Go from having a large coffee to having a small.
  • Go from a small coffee to a small half-caf.
  • Go from half-caf to black tea.
  • Go from black tea to green tea.
  • Go from green tea to no caffeine. You can have herbal or decaf tea.

5. Stick to a regular sleep schedule as much as possible. Even on the weekends, try and wake up within 90 minutes of when you do on weekdays.

6. Keep your bedroom dark and cold; even nightlights can keep you awake. Make sure your dreaming den is chilly, this helps you stay under the covers and hit hibernation mode.

Other ways to get your sleep back on track involve taking control of your stress during the day.  Delegate tasks, make time for mindfulness and meditation, and practice deep breathing.  Grab the good pillows, comfy sheets and get ready for a good night’s sleep.  Your body and brain depend on it.

 

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The Dementia Epidemic

This infograph courtesy of MBA Healthcare Management highlights the concern for the growing number of cases of Dementia.

Dementia
Source: MBA-Healthcare-Management.com

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