Tag Archive for Emily Roberts

Help Your Child Earn and Learn This Summer

Emily Roberts MA, LPC

Summer can be a great time to teach kids about the value of a dollar. Math and money skills, creativity, and even marketing can be taught with these kid-friendly summer jobs. Self-esteem and confidence comes from feeling independent and learning the importance of earning and saving can never be taught too early. Each week we will share our #StressLessSummer tips and share other top experts including Dr.Lynne Kenny and Wendy Young, authors of Bloom to make this the happiest and healthiest summer yet!lemonade-stand

Neighborhood Needs

Even at a young age (with some adult supervision) helping out a neighbor who has their hands full or is going on vacation can be a money maker for kids. From watering their plants, mowing lawns, dog walking, pet sitting, or even babysitting, kids can cash in. Help them make posters, depending on their interests and ideas, after they create it, you can help through email or phone calls. Have them do the initial “marketing” and ideas so that they are invested.

Rethink Lemonade

The idea of a simple lemonade stand can be a math and marketing lesson. Kids can research; what’s the best time of day for getting the most customers? Where is best location? What will be refreshing? How much will we need to spend on supplies? Get creative, how can they make their stand unique, instead of classic Kool-Aid, maybe slices of watermelon or Popsicle. The summer options are endless.

Household Help

Not all chores are part of a child’s allowance or family duties. Sometimes the extra work can pay off, literally. Running an errand on their bike, washing the car, ironing shirts, or taking care sibling, can teach responsibility and build self-esteem.

Clear the Closets for Cash

If the idea of a garage sale is maddening, you are not alone, which is why there are so many resale and consignment stores and e-stores for kids these days. Help them go through their old toys and clothes, picking out things they don’t play with or fit into. Kids (and adults) can earn money on the spot.

National Resale Chains for Babies and Kids:

Once upon a Child

Kid to Kid

Children’s Orchard

Pumpkin Patch

For Tweens and Teens:

Plato’s Closet

Buffalo Exchange

Here are some valuable ideas from experts around the world to help you bring the summer fun to your home.

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Sue Atkins @sueatkins

Nurture yourself this summer and always LINK

Wendy Young @kidlutions

Smile more stress less LINK

Naomi Richards @thekidscoach

It’s not to late to plan fun activities, rain or shine.  LINK

Vivian Sabel @viviensabel

Fun = Simplicity LINK

Happy Family Superfoods @HAPPYsuperfoods

Summer Fun Printable ~ 50 activities LINK

Lynne Kenney

Your daily health organizer Free Printable LINK

E A Stewart @thespicyrd

Nutritious recipes for family health LINK

Emily Roberts and Neurogistics @EmilyRobertsLPC @neurogistics

Hydrate for Happiness LINK

Eight simple ways to feel stressfree this summer LINK

 

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Emily Roberts MA, LPC is the clinical therapist for the Neurogistics Children’s Program. She has worked with Neurogistics for over a decade. Emily is also an award-winning author of Express Yourself: A Teen Girls Guide to Speaking Up and Becoming Who You Are, Psychotherapist, TV & Media Contributor, educational speaker and parenting consultant.  Express Yourself is available at bookstores nationwide and on Amazon. To learn more about Emily click here.

 

 

 

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Hot & Happy: Hydration Tips for Kids

hot happy hydratedDr. Lynne Kenney and Kidlutions provide famliles with tips to make this summer the best one yet.

The sweltering summer months can be so difficult on our little ones. Frustration and feeling out of control can be amplified with the heat and humidity, robbing our bodies of water. Avoid falling for the myth that giving them any liquid will keep them hydrated and happy, it can actually cause more harm than good. Sugar, soda, and chemicals can be more dehydrating and damaging. When we don’t get adequate H2O our bodies don’t move cells around, which can cause more physical and mental exhaustion.

Hydration Tips and Tricks

  • An excellent method for measuring how much water is needed each day is to divide your child’s body weight by 2. This will determine the number of ounces of water necessary for optimal health. If they are really active this may need to be increased.
  • Avoid juice; the sugar can cause dehydration and a crash later on. Freeze juice (100% juice) in ice cube trays or add berries to water bottles.
  • Try these helpful hydration tips for keeping your child hydrated during the hot summer months.Opt for coconut water, which replenishes the body naturally and has potassium.
  • Even sports drinks can be dehydrating with the added sodium and sugar, unless your child has just done a 10K opt for water instead.
  • Make it fizzy. There are some amazing carbonating beverage makers that literally pay for themselves in 10-20 uses. A bubbles and some natural flavor from a orange or lemon can make drinking water fun for little ones, plus they can get creative with what they want to add (grapefruit and strawberry is a must try).
  • Avoid flavor packets that can be added to water should also be avoided because they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, which are damaging to brain and dehydrating.
  • Dilute juice with water using a ratio of at least 50:50, make sure it is 100% juice, no additives.

Try these helpful hydration tips for keeping your child hydrated during the hot summer months.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Emily Roberts MA, LPC is the clinical therapist for the Neurogistics Children’s Program. She has worked with Neurogistics for over a decade. Emily is also an award-winning author of Express Yourself: A Teen Girls Guide to Speaking Up and Becoming Who You Are, Psychotherapist, TV & Media Contributor, educational speaker and parenting consultant.  Express Yourself is available at bookstores nationwide and on Amazon. To learn more about Emily click here.

 

 

 

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Daily Health Organzier from Dr. Lynne

#StresslessSummer Your Daily Health Organizer Free Printable

Dr. Lynne Kenney does it again!  Here she shares an invaluable tool that all of our families (adults too) can benefit from!  Check out her book Bloom Brain Based Parenting for More Helpful Parenting Tips

Recently, we were on holiday as a family and I found it so easy to exercise and eat well every day. We were on relaxation speed. But when we got home it was back to chasing horses at 7 am, writing til noon, phone calls, radio shows etc. Whoa! Where did all that health fly to? So yesterday I made a little daily health sheet for our fridge to bring fitness front-of-mind. I thought you all might enjoy it as well.  Wendy Young @kidlutions, I and all our colleagues on the #StresslessSummer series ~ @TheSpicyRD, @HAPPYsuperfoods, Sue Atkins @sueatkins, Naomi Richards @thekidscoach, Emily Roberts @EmilyRobertsLPC, Maria Freeman @littlejots, Deb McNelis @braininsights, Victoria @HMMilitary, Jan Katzen @nutritionistjan, Kelly Cairns @kellycairns and more wish you a happy, healthy summer!

Bloom Health Org

 

 

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Emily Roberts MA, LPC is the clinical therapist for the Neurogistics Children’s Program. She has worked with Neurogistics for over a decade. Emily is also an award-winning author of Express Yourself: A Teen Girls Guide to Speaking Up and Becoming Who You Are, Psychotherapist, TV & Media Contributor, educational speaker and parenting consultant.  Express Yourself is available at bookstores nationwide and on Amazon. To learn more about Emily click here.

 

 

 

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Books for Self-Esteem & Confidence Building

By Emily Roberts MA, LPC

Walking into the self-help aisle of your local Barnes & Noble or logging onto Amazon can be a bit daunting. There are thousands of books on building self-esteem and self-confidence to choose from and with the hefty price tags, you don’t want to walk out with a book that just doesn’t do it for you.

Part of my job is reading self-help, psychology, and all the books in-between. I find the ones that resonate with me and have helped those I work with, then pass them on to clients or friends. These are some of my current favorites for creative and effective building of self-confidence and self-esteem in adults and children.

Self-Confidence, Self-Esteem Books For Adults

Click to buy The ToolsThe Tools: Transform Your Problems Into Courage, Confidence and Creativity by Phil Stutz and Gary Michels

Hollywood psychotherapists, Stutz and Michels, have created a groundbreaking book about personal growth, that provides an effective set of five tools that bring about dynamic change. The Tools provides solutions to the biggest complaint patients have about traditional therapy, “the interminable wait for change to begin.” The authors use a language that we can all identify with and provide insight and strategic tools to build confidence and release fear. For years, Stutz and Michels taught these techniques to an exclusive patient base and helped to create lasting change.  I have seen these tools work for clients and therapists alike.

 

Click to buy The Anxiety and Phobia WorkbookThe Anxiety and Phobia Workbook by Edmund J. Bourne.

I have used this book with many clients, and the tips are so easy I was able to implement them into my own life as well! The educational component, learning how one develops anxiety and low self-esteem is invaluable and the exercises have proven to be nothing less than a success. I appreciate his vast understanding of how self-esteem is a component of anxiety, as well as allowing for chapters to just address self-esteem and assertiveness building.

Self-Esteem Books For Parents

Click to buy Princess Recovery
Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters
by Jennifer L Hartstein PsyD

This is by far one of my favorite parenting books for girls! Applicable to anyone who works children or parents, Dr. Jennifer Hartstein is the go-to for raising girls.  She can be seen on NBC’s The Today Show and CBS’s Early Show as an expert in child and adult psychology. Certainly a page turner, Dr. Hartstein gives readers insight into what our young girls are going through developmentally and how our culture impacts their sense of self. She provides readers with strategies to build self-esteem and confidence in every age group, starting at 2 years old. By explaining how girls are interpreting mixed messages from parents, peers, and the media, readers get an inside look at how we can instill confidence and self-esteem in our daughters that will last a lifetime. The best part is that after each chapter, you will have the tools to implement immediately.

For Kids

Click to buy Cool, Calm, and ConfidentCool, Calm, and Confident: A Workbook to Help Kids Learn Assertiveness Skills by Lisa Schab.

I have tested the exercise in this book out numerous times with the groups I teach. The exercises are effective and help children stand-up for themselves, learn to be both kind and assertive communication, and develop self-confidence and a positive self-image. Using this workbook is an easy and effective way to teach self-esteem, especially when read with an adult. I urge parents to purchase this book and work on it at home with their little ones.

 

Click to buy How Full Is Your Bucket for KidsHow Full is Your Bucket? For Kids By Time Rath

This adorable and educational read teaches children how to fill their mental “bucket” by being kind and building confidence. Rath tells a story that children as young as three can identify with, and how everyday situations are opportunities to “fill your bucket” with positivity and kindness. This book is a visual for teaching children how we each feel and how our actions and words impact ourselves and each other. Kids as young as 4 have related to this book with ease.

 

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Emily Roberts MA, LPC is the clinical therapist for the Neurogistics Children’s Program. She has worked with Neurogistics for over a decade. Emily is also an award-winning author of Express Yourself: A Teen Girls Guide to Speaking Up and Becoming Who You Are, Psychotherapist, TV & Media Contributor, educational speaker and parenting consultant.  Express Yourself is available at bookstores nationwide and on Amazon. To learn more about Emily click here.

 

 

 

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What is “Clean Eating”?

Emily Roberts MA, LPC

There are so many diets and fads out; it’s difficult to know what is best for you and your family, and what is more work than it’s worth.  Paleo, gluten-free, grain-free, raw, the list goes on.  One of the lifestyle diets we hear most is “Clean Eating”. This is a great plan for many, depending on your dietary needs and restrictions; however, let’s get clean on what it really means.

Clean Eating is not just washing your produce well and keeping a close eye on labels. Simply put, clean eating is avoiding all processed food, and relying on fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, rather than prepackaged or fast food. The purpose of clean eating is to make sure you are getting your nutrients and your health from whole foods, and avoiding junk food.  According to research, a clean eating lifestyle can keep you healthy, or help you regain your health if you haven’t been well. If this sounds close to impossible, to only eat clean, I hear you! However, it’s easier than you may think.  One of my favorite blogs these days, The Gracious Pantry, puts it in perspective:

  1. Eat Lots of Plants, Fruits, and Veggies – Emphasize foods that are close to nature. If you focus on foods that are off a tree, bush, plant or vine, you’ve pretty much got it covered. Stay away from foods that are processed.
  2. Include Meats, Fish, and Poultry - Eat meats that are whole and straight from the butcher, not prepackaged (which are sometimes filled with nitrates and other chemicals).
  3. Enjoy Grains - Eat grains that are still complete and haven’t been broken down into “glue”. Stick to brown rice, whole wheat, and other whole grains (For a list of foods to stock your pantry with, check out this list.)
  4. Don’t Always Trust Labels – “Whole Grain” or “natural” doesn’t always mean it is.  Look closely at the ingredients: white flour is not a whole grain, and “natural” spices and flavorings can encompass surprising ingredients – clarify with the company.
  5. The Fewer Ingredients, the Better. Try not to purchase foods that have more than 3-6 ingredients in the ingredient list, according to The Gracious Pantry. If you can’t pronounce it, and don’t recognize it, it likely shouldn’t go in your body.

You Can Have Carbohydrates

Avoid anything white or “enriched”.  Once again, if you are trying to eat clean, then you will want to purchase only those products that say 100% WHOLE grain/meal/flour.

Your Whole Family Can Benefit.

Processed foods are linked to lower IQs in children, research suggests. When we think of creating a lifestyle (depending on your child’s unique dietary needs), many parents are choosing to eat clean, most of the time.  A family I talked to recently said they do 80:20, 80% clean, 20% real life.  The book Clean Eating for Busy Families: Get Meals on the Table in Minutes with Simple and Satisfying Whole-Foods Recipes You and Your Kids Will Love (Fair Winds Press, 2012), by Michelle Dudash, R.D. can help, as well as many of the websites and blogs out there:

The Gracious Pantry

Clean Eating Magazine

Michelle Dudash

 

 

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Emily Roberts MA, LPC is the clinical therapist for the Neurogistics Children’s Program. She has worked with Neurogistics for over a decade. Emily is also an award-winning author of Express Yourself: A Teen Girls Guide to Speaking Up and Becoming Who You Are, Psychotherapist, TV & Media Contributor, educational speaker and parenting consultant.  Express Yourself is available at bookstores nationwide and on Amazon. To learn more about Emily click here.

 

 

 

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Mental Health Stigma: Parenting & Children’s Health

Mental health stigma keeps many parents from getting their children the mental health they need. Our Therapist and blogger, Emily Roberts, LPC, addresses stigma, parenting and your child’s mental health on HealthyPlace.com and asks you to join the campaign to end the stigmatization of getting help. Many of the over 46 million Americans who suffer from some type of mental health disorder may describe and define stigma using one of these words or phrases: hate, discrimination, prejudice, fear inducing, humiliating, hurtful. In order for us to get the best treatments for ourselves, children, and families, we need to accept that the benefits override the possible stigma.  Learn how:

To learn more about HealthyPlace’s stand up for mental health campaign click the button below.

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Mental Health Disorders Info

 

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Emily Roberts MA, LPC is the clinical therapist for the Neurogistics Children’s Program. She has worked with Neurogistics for over a decade. Emily is also an award-winning author of Express Yourself: A Teen Girls Guide to Speaking Up and Becoming Who You Are, Psychotherapist, TV & Media Contributor, educational speaker and parenting consultant.  Express Yourself is available at bookstores nationwide and on Amazon. To learn more about Emily click here.

 

 

 

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In the News: PMS linked to Iron and Serotonin Levels

The American Journal of Epidemiology published a study linking PMS symptoms to low iron intake, while noting that too much potassium could contribute to symptoms. 10-year study of more than 3,000 women has found that dietary iron may reduce the risk for premenstrual syndrome (PMS).  Researchers found  that women in the highest 20 percent for iron intake were about 40 percent less likely to suffer PMS. These findings suggest that dietary minerals may be useful in preventing PMS.

PMS is also linked to low serotonin levels.   Serotonin is the “happy neurotransmitter” responsible for regulating mood and sleep.  Many amino acids come from protein rich foods, that are also high in iron, which boost energy and mental alertness. After protein breaks down into amino acids during digestion, the acids travel from the bloodstream to the brain, where they increase levels of certain neurotransmitters. It isn’t only protein that increases serotonin.  Carbohydrates increase insulin which helps with amino acid competition and gives serotonin a chance (because it is more difficult to make than the excitatory neurotransmitters. Tryptophan, the amino acid responsible for creating serotonin, produces calming effects when ingested.  Iron and protein filled foods are shown to ward off moodiness and physiological symptoms associated with PMS.

How do you get more Iron in your diet? From the foods below. Women, between 18-50 years of age, are said to need 18 milligrams daily   Another helpful hint, combining Vitamin C rich foods with iron helps the absorption rate.

  • Red meat
  • Pumpkin, sesame, or squash seeds
  • Turkey
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Peas
  • Broccoli
  • String beans
  • Strawberries
  • Watermelon
  • Raisins
  • Egg yolks
  • Dark, leafy greens (spinach, collards, kale)
  • Dried fruit (prunes, raisins)
  • Iron-enriched cereals and grains (check the labels)
  • Mollusks (oysters, clams, scallops)
  • Beans, lentils, chick peas and soybeans
  • Artichokes

 

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Emily Roberts MA, LPC is the clinical therapist for the Neurogistics Children’s Program. She has worked with Neurogistics for over a decade. Emily is also an award-winning author of Express Yourself: A Teen Girls Guide to Speaking Up and Becoming Who You Are, Psychotherapist, TV & Media Contributor, educational speaker and parenting consultant.  Express Yourself is available at bookstores nationwide and on Amazon. To learn more about Emily click here.

 

 

 

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Recommended Reading

By Emily Roberts MA, LPC

Often times I give parents book  recommendations, and if you are like most parents out there you have a library full of books that were helpful at some point. These are some of the ones that I most frequently recommend.

In an Unspoken Voice: How The Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness by Peter Levine

 

Trauma Through a Child’s Eyes: Awakening The Ordinary Miracle of Healing by Peter Levine

 

The Whole Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind by Daniel Siegel

 

Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters by Jennifer L Hartstein

 

The Connected Child: Bringing Hope and Healing To Your Adopted Family by Karyn Purvis

 

How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk by Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish

 

 

 

 

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Emily Roberts MA, LPC is the clinical therapist for the Neurogistics Children’s Program. She has worked with Neurogistics for over a decade. Emily is also an award-winning author of Express Yourself: A Teen Girls Guide to Speaking Up and Becoming Who You Are, Psychotherapist, TV & Media Contributor, educational speaker and parenting consultant.  Express Yourself is available at bookstores nationwide and on Amazon. To learn more about Emily click here.

 

 

 
 

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Eggcellent Eggs

Are you getting enough eggs in your diet? Here's how to add more this Easter.

Easter is just around the corner and a good reminder to add more eggs into our daily diets.  Eggs are a nutritional powerhouse; an easy source vitamins and, nutrients. Even better, eggs are a complete protein, meaning they contain all 9 of the essential amino acids including the serotonin precursor, tryptophan.     Just one egg is filled with healthy brain benefits. With only 75-80 calories per egg, 7 grams of protein, 5 grams of fat and only around 1.6 grams of saturated fat, you can’t beat (excuse the pun) an egg for a perfect dietary staple.  They provide disease-fighting nutrients, vitamin E, vitamin D and omega-3s. As a satisfying source of protein, they have been shown to help dieters feel fuller longer, and even those with high cholesterol can enjoy the benefits of egg whites. Even better, according to new USDA study, the cholesterol in one egg has gone down by 14 percent!

One crack of an egg will only run you about 15 cents, making it one of the most inexpensive sources of protein out there.  Eggs are not just for breakfast, they are a wonderful, heart healthy, alternative to meat and a good way to experiment with new recipes.

Instead of a fat-filled casserole try a heart healthy frittata. Frittatas are often seen on the brunch menu, but you can make them as a dinner option as well.  Throw in your favorite veggies, meat (turkey bacon, soy sausage, or ham if you prefer) and you have an amazing dish that is much lower calorie than a quiche and allows you to be creative in the kitchen. Try Bethenny Frankel’s vegetarian, low-fat version or this Asparagus, Spring Onion and Pancetta Frittata

Instead of tiresome chicken or beef try: Broccoli and Sausage Egg Muffins which can actually be a staple at any meal.  Check out the link!

Instead of frozen, soggy waffles or cold cereal, try a breakfast taco (a Tex-Mex staple) instead.  While the breakfast classics may give you the carbohydrate rush you want to get going in the morning, it doesn’t provide you with nearly enough protein. Grab a tortilla, scramble some eggs (or egg whites), add potatoes or beans and a little salsa and you’ve got breakfast on-the-go that is good for you.

Another tip, make a dozen hard boiled eggs and keep them on hand.  You will have a breakfast on-the-go, protein to add to your lunchtime salad or just a healthy snack that you can’t help but eat. Eggcellent!

 

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Get Your Greens In!

By: Emily Roberts MA, LPC

St. Patrick’s Day is this Saturday, the perfect time to incorporate some greens into your diet and your child to try something new.  Make this holiday about incorporating fun, healthy, nutritious, and good for you greens into your diet.

Pistachios- these protein filled nuts are one of the most nutritious snack out there!   They are the lowest calorie nut and provide a wealth of vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants.  Grab a handful as a snack or throw them on you favorite salad.  Kids love them, and the shell makes them fun to eat.  http://www.pistachiohealth.com/

Kale Chips- now you may be thinking “there is no way something this green can taste good!” They do!  You can buy them at your local natural foods store or make your own. Kale is a super food that is by far one of the most nutritious greens and when you bake them, this leafy green turns into a crispy, delicious snack.  http://allrecipes.com/recipe/baked-kale-chips/

Kiwis- technically Kiwi’s are a berry and referred to as the kiwifruit.  They have more vitamin c than an orange, are filled with as much potassium as a banana, and contain less than 50 calories.  There are many other powerful ingredients.  Eat them on their own or add to a fruit salad for a change of pace and a pop of color. http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/the-nutrition-of-kiwi.html

Edamame- Also known as the “soy bean,” this  vegetable is packed with protein and has heart healthy benefits.  It’s a great “green food” that can be eaten as a snack, pureed into dishes, and is even used in some deserts.  I personally like mine with a bit of sea salt and soy sauce.  http://www.edamame.com/

Avocado- One of the best foods you can eat! Avocados provide nearly 20 essential nutrients, including fiber, potassium, Vitamin E, B-vitamins and folic acid. They also act as a “nutrient booster” by enabling the body to absorb more fat-soluble nutrients, and are considered “good fat”.  So serve up some guacamole and chips, add some avocado to your next dish or eat one with a little sea salt.  Delicious! http://www.avocado.org/nutrition/

So don’t forget to wear green, head to the grocery store, and get your greens in!

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